Walking Faster

Part of my research into filmmaking financing and distribution has educated me on the ideal expenses of a legitimate production. Jeff Deverett, an experienced filmmaker with a background in distribution, suggested that the marketing for a film should equal 60-100% of the overall budget. This is a much greater percentage than I ever would have guessed. Other estimates give marketing a much smaller figure. Given Deverett’s experience and knowledge of the film market, I trust his opinion more.

I don’t, however, have the income to match my marketing expenses with the budget my short film costs to produce. Working on such a small scale means that I’m already only spending a buck when it’s absolutely necessary. Though I may not be able to match that percentage financially, I may be able to compete when it comes to time and effort.

I’ve been putting in work this week to research topics that are discussed in my short film. That’s why you’ve seen posts about Alaister Crowley, Uri Gellar, and the Ganzfeld experiment. In truth, I’ve greatly enjoyed the research. I would like to further my understanding of parapsychological history to create short documentaries for my youtube channel. My theory is that this will attract an audience for the subject matter my film contains.

I plan to launch my kickstarter campaign in January. I was hoping to submit the campaign for review already, but I recently concluded Episode 5 could really use a series recap that covers the major events in episodes 1-4. I’ve been editing that video the past 2 days.

Move fast and break things.

That’s the premise of the marketing plan I would like to implement. It essentially suggests “throw stuff at the wall and see what sticks.” I don’t think I could ever publish writings or videos that I am not proud of – but I did spend 2 hours yesterday remastering 1 scene of dialogue from Episode 4. All those changes make a difference, but there will be a music track playing over that conversation during the series recap anyway.

I’ve got to improve at time management. By setting aside 30 minutes a day to simply publish updates across social media platforms I feel I may begin to reach a more sizable audience. Pissing away time hunched behind a computer screen tweaking the velocity an animated arm moves at is a comparatively wasteful undertaking.

I plan to release 5 “behind the scenes” videos from the making of Mountain Cult in January and 3 short documentaries. I’ve wasted so much time figuring out how to move ‘X’ just to get started on ‘Y’ it’s embarrassing. I’ve got to accept the pangs of building a youtube audience – despite having no desire to be a fucking youtuber. I don’t think many people do. But by building an audience there I can make great strides towards securing finance and distribution for the types of movies I do want to make.

If you haven’t seen the trailer for my upcoming short film, feel free to check it out below.